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Open Content and Private Schools?

09/19/2010

Creative Commons and Private Schools?
If you are a lover of information and have been breathing over the last 3 or 4 years you may have noticed the coming-of-age of Open Courseware. Yale and stanford offer a huge range of undergrad and graduate course material online. The iTunesU “Store” is a huge repository of free courses on everything from Game Theory, Economics, Biology, Thermodynamics and any language you might want to learn. Massively Open Online courses are also a new concept in this OpenEducation movement.

Coming back from the board retreat my co-worker and I were having our usual lively discussions and we started discussing the use of CreativeCommons licensing at a private school.

At a public school the implication is obvious. CreativeCommons does not allow you to use the original or create derivative works and charge for it, in the most basic sense. So in public school, which is not paid for directly, there is no conflict.

But at a private school that costs about $40,000 a year, lets say, we use content from the Khan Academy to help our students understand some Algebra 2 concepts, and we remix a couple of those videos into one whole video that is supplementary and secondary to the main course material. For kids who need extra help, not everyone gets a copy of this. Is this a violation of Salman Khan’s CC licensure?

Exmple Number 2
Private school educators use GoogleBooks to compile a reader of out of copyright stories and commentary that is available under CC licensure. During second semester this reader is the main reader used in multiple 9th grade English classes. Is this kind of use at a private school violating the CreativeCommons licensing agreement?

The students are not paying for the materials directly.
Does the fact that the students are paying for the schooling affect the licensing in an educational setting?
How is CC applied to private schools?

Are there any educators, public or private that are dealing with CC issues and questions?

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